Rozovian’s Music Log

www.ocremix.org/artist/4795/

Posts Tagged ‘music’

How to Handle Criticism

Posted by Ad on February 15, 2014

TotalBiscuit, the Cynical Brit, has had one of his videos censored via the copyright flagging system. Not cool. The situation is still developing and unraveling, but the whole thing blew up not so much over the copyright abuse, but rather over how the devs of the game TB reviewed don’t seem to be able to handle criticism.

Rather than rant about copyright and add fuel to what the internet is already turning into a rather large firestorm against the devs, I’ll cover a different angle: how to handle criticism.

Your game, your music, your art, your work; whatever you do, you’ll likely take it personally when someone eviscerates your work, whether this is accurate criticism or hate/trolling. It’s not necessarily easy to ignore random disembodied voices on the internet, but the higher profile someone is, or the more you value their opinion, the worse it’ll sting.

The approach I have to criticism is to understand everything, and fix what you agree with.

Let’s say someone says an arrangement of mine is cookie-cuter, paint-by-numbers, blocky or newby. First, I have to understand what they mean. My arrangement might not have good transitions, might not differentiate parts with different rhythms, textures or dynamics, might have too little or too much variation between parts. It could be just one of these, but it’s more likely that it’s a bit of everything.

Then I have to agree. Theres two parts to this: I have to agree with their observation, and I have to agree that it’s a problem. My chiptune-y track sounds like cheap synths? Not a problem. My orchestral piece sounds like cheap synths? Problem… if it’s true.

Finally, I have to fix what I agree with, if possible. Cheap synth orchestra? Either go for it as a stylistic choice, embrace it, do it well; or make it sound more real; or scrap it. Cheap synth chiptune-y track? Not a problem, doesn’t need fixing.

But the thing is, just because I don’t agree with criticism doesn’t mean I’m right. If I do something, it should sound intentional. It doesn’t matter whether it actually _is_ intentional, it just has to sound that way. My cheap synth orchestra may be the sound I’m going for, but I’d have to make that obvious somehow. Easiest trick is to name it something like “Pocket Orchestra” or “Synthetic SYmphony” or something along those lines. But preferably, the music should be able to communicate this on its own. An exposed, really cheap synth solo early on, that highlights the cheapness and is still expressive should do the trick.

That’s doing it right. How can you do it wrong?

Ignoring. Arguably a better approach than some other wrong approaches. Ignore the trolls, but don’t ignore valid criticism. Dismissing it with a “well you don’t have to like it, other people will” isn’t going to help you make your work any better.

Arguing. This isn’t about valid arguments to better explain your positions and understand where the other party is coming from. This is about questioning the other party’s qualifications, eg “who are you to say an orchestra doesn’t sound like this?” (an ad hominem attack). This is about undue defense, eg “well it’s a style choice to have a square synth in my historically correct baroque track”. This is about justifying things instead of re-evaluating them in light of the criticism. That’s wrong.

Flaming, raging, threatening. These are all pretty much the same, because they’re all about throwing a tantrum in some form. Legal threats count. Threats of violence count. Threats of reporting count. Personal threats certainly count. Ranting, as a form of venting, is a way to deal with frustration, but do that somewhere else.

Magic. I’m not talking forest rites and hexes and stuff, I mean trying to make the criticism go away. Flagging stuff as spam or copyright infringement, downvoting, deleting… Bribing? Whatever. It’s a form of ignoring, but offensively. And it’s offensive to anyone who values the craft.

These are in order of how bad they can backfire. Ignoring something generally doesn’t backfire, but you might not get a lot more good feedback that way. Less bug reports, less suggestions, less valid criticism. Arguing is likely to offend the person offering criticism, and is likely to drive them away or make them hostile towards you and your work… which isn’t a good thing.

Flaming, raging, and threatening tends to backfire spectacularly and become little wars on the internet where supporters of different causes start attacking each other on every medium and every platform they can get at. And worse, magic, when it gets out, tends to ruin whoever tried to censor someone else. The Streisand effect goes into full swing when this gets out. The bigger you and/or your critic are, the bigger the backlash. And any PR is _not_ good PR…

…as I’m sure certain devs have noticed by now.

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Ninja Consumers

Posted by Ad on March 27, 2012

Finland’s allegedly trailing way behind our neighbor Sweden in consumption of streamed and downloaded music. I don’t believe that, I think it’s just a difference in behavior that accounts for the over 30% difference.

I may have mentioned having attempted to buy Logic 9 on the App Store, but was unable to actually pay. The store only accepts a bunch of credit cards, which I know better than to get. After some correspondence with Apple’s customer service (who politely/robotically suggested, repeatedly, that I should just get a credit card), I decided it wasn’t worth the trouble. So far, Logic Express 8 serves me fine, and when that fails, I can move to a different DAW. I’ve heard good things about Digital Performer, I’ve been looking at Ableton Live for live performance reasons, there’s always the very affordable Reaper, and beyond those a myriad of other options.

What bothered me the most is the lack of a PayPal option in Apple’s stores, as it’s an option in the US but not here. That’s what I use to buy stuff on Steam and Bandcamp, it’s a very convenient payment options that Apple seems to allow in other countries. Having to get a credit card is a hoop I might jump through if there was no other option. But that’s not the case. There’s other software… and other means.

My theory on piracy is that there’s three types of pirates: pirates of convenience, pirates of economy, and pirates of ideals. Pirates of ideals are the free-culture hippies that think information shouldn’t be locked up and everything should be available for free. Not sure to what extent I agree with them, there’s freedom of information acts on one side, and indie artists’ earnings stolen by labels and royalty-collecting agencies on the other. Pirates of economy are the ones who can’t afford the stuff they pirate, or who just don’t want to pay. In the developing world, I support this attitude. Get stuff, use stuff, build business and education. In the developed world, there’s certainly a lower class that may not be able to afford to keep up with the music and movies their more affluent neighbors consume, but the majority population can afford the 10 bucks an album costs these days.

Still, the most interesting type are the pirates of convenience. These include brats with a runaway sense of entitlement as well as lazy ppl who just want stuff in the most convenient way possible, and probably further still in… some direction. I use Steam because it’s convenient. It’s the ultimate combination of store, personal library and networking tool. I’ve used other means of getting the stuff I wanted… because it was convenient.

The thing is, pirates of convenience may well pay for their stuff (even to the point where they aren’t pirates anymore) if they get it without jumping through hoops. Bandcamp does this well. With a clean interface and a few clicks, I buy music and support the artist. I typically listen to music by my friends, released on Bandcamp (or ocremix), but if I wanted something else, Apple’s iTunes Store is among the last places I’d buy from. No credit card, no PayPal option, no way of paying short of buying a dozen of those iTunes Store cards from Apple Stores irl. Considering there are music stores out there that attempt to sell stuff released for free (eg free releases from Bandcamp, ocremix albums et al), I feel safer getting music from a place where I know the wrong ppl aren’t profiting from the artists’ work.

Despite speaking from a very limited experience with music stores, I think the main reason Finland’s trailing in music downloading/streaming is in measuring the wrong thing: only purchases and streaming services that are being tracked by the music… tracking… ppl. There’s YouTube (-to-mp3), there’s torrents, there’s a lot of ways to get music besides iTunes, Spotify, and whatever else was tracked.

It’s not like Finns are tech-illiterates. It may actually be the opposite. That’s why I don’t think my ISP blocking The Pirate Bay is gonna stop ppl.

Two more things, mostly unrelated: I’ve got a plan/idea/design for a movie/tv-show site, one that includes a way to make money from the site. There’s just the problems of convincing advertisers, and to consolidate shows and movies into a single service rather than have each studio and network demand special treatment/jack up prices for their catalogues or otherwise make their own services… thus driving ppl to the quasi-legal link sites and torrent searches instead. Tho for a single-network service it might work, too. Maybe I should just patent my idea and sit on it, then sue anyone that came up with it independently if they get big. That’s apparently how the big tech companies do it. If only game devs could do the same with to get CloneVille (as in Zynga) off the map.

The other thing is my new album plan: my old music as a free album… or album series. We’ll see. I think I have four tracks being worked on atm that fits my old methods, so they’re candidates for this album. Any proper album would be a later concern, now I’ll just focus on finishing random tracks and giving some extra attention to my few thousands of old tracks.

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Why I Buy Movies

Posted by Ad on February 4, 2012

In light of recent multilateral agreements/conspiracies, I thought I’d comment on my media purchasing habits. Idunno, maybe it’ll shed some light on how someone on internet is thinking, for the luddites with all the lobbying money – which quite frankly could be better spent, as could the litigation budget.

I like movies. I like quality effects, I like quality storytelling, I like quality stuff. I wish there was more good movies out there, rather than committees-designed mainstream hooks. Just compare Attack the Block and Transformers. Guess which one I prefer. A hint: I like it despite my general aversion to almost every form of British English.

But when I walk through the movie store – and I still prefer to buy movies that way – what I want isn’t just the movie. The movie I can find on the net if I want to, and I’d have a way better experience of it if I could see it in the movie theatre. In 2d. So what I’m looking for in the store are movies that I’ve heard good things about and want to see, but haven’t bothered to go looking for them; they’re movies I’ve seen and want to see again; they’re movies I think need my support; and they’re movies I can learn from.

I hate coming across DVDs – yes I still use DVDs – with no special features. No commentaries, no making-of, no cast and crew interviews. The film itself I can experience just fine in the theatre, and I’m fine with doing that just once (unless it’s actually a good movie).

I think this could be the future of commercial media. You can get the basic version for free, but if you want an HD version, bonus materials, associated materials, codes for streaming services – you buy the thing. The film’s extended cut, score and making-of, the game’s music and art, karaoke and DJ versions of every song on the album…

And while we’re at it, it’d be nice to get a data track to go along with any film or tv show, one that maps out the overall levels. Having a TV show play loud sounds ridiculous during the silent parts, and trying to hear the soft parts of a movie without turning up the entire film isn’t convenient. Volume automation, on or off.

I also want a helicopter.

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Apple are Morons, RIAA worse

Posted by Ad on January 24, 2012

Lately, iTunes has been asking me to sign in a few seconds after starting the app. I get it, it’s a music store that I persist in using as the music library it used to be. But you’d expect the program to let me opt out of logging in every time. What’s more annoying is that it asks twice, with some delay in between. This even happens when the iTunes Store is disabled in the Parental options.

I had a similar problem with an old version of Photoshop Elements, where every so often after I’ve started it, it “couldn’t get info” from… somewhere. Didn’t matter if I was in the middle of tweaking an adjustment layer or effect, it just dropped everything to let me know that it couldn’t get info from wherever. I’m tolerating that because once it’s tried a few times, it stops. Besides, I don’t use PS for much anyway, and that old version will be retired along with my old laptoip once I get a new one.

But when Apple does this to me, it’s worse. It’s not a glitch, it’s something that someone decided was a good idea. I don’t like the idea of logging in to do stuff on my own computer. I don’t use the iTunes store, and I’ve only bought a handful or Apps via the App Store. While it never actually requires me to log in, asking – twice – is annoying.

Speaking of which, I’m not likely to purchase much of anything from either store anyway. I don’t have a credit card, and I can’t get either store to accept PayPal, which I use for my online purchases. I’ve heard there was an issue with the App Store charging as much as 4000USD for Lion through some glitch, but that’s no reason to pull support for it… especially as so many other parts of the internet use PayPal without any apparent problems. I mean, every game I’ve bought on Steam I’ve bought via PayPal. IIRC, all the music software I’ve bought over the net I’ve bought with PayPal.

And segueing from iTunes, the fallout from the rightfully rejected SOPA/PIPA has shown the true colors of the MPAA and the RIAA. The way I see it, we could do without those two. The less power they have, the more they’ll have to focus on good music, not just metrics and a bland copy of the next hot thing. Maybe they’ll support real artist instead of manufacturing their own?

The way I understand it, Spotify has to deal with whatever they demand for their music, and if Spotify doesn’t make enough dough to keep up, they lose their contracts with the big music companies. That might actually be a good thing. If I knew my money was going to the ppl that make the music I listen to, I’d happily pay for a subscription to Spotify. Currently, I wouldn’t.

If the big labels pull their stuff, Spotify could survive as a transparent, independent music platform, delivering great music, supporting the artists that make the music, promoting new and interesting indie artists. Last I used Spotify, it was a search engine for names of songs and artists, with a “featured” page with the “hottest” music. I don’t care. I’m apparently too hipster to like most modern pop music. What if I wanna find some new, cool, underappreciated artist, or discover the unknowns hits of some niche genre, or catch up on jazz history or video game releases?

The movie industry could do better too. While stuff like Attack the Block and other gold does appear from time to time, we’re still getting huge budgets on mediocre films. Sure, Inception was cool, but Avatar was predictable and gimmicky, like the entire, color-ruining, still not focus-altering 3d thing. Granted, you need money to make movies, so why not spend more money on movies and less on bribes?

While big, spectacular films, good or not, will always draw ppl in for the things that money can buy on screen, the record industry is in a terrible position where music is all over the place and the value of any given album or song has dropped dramatically.

While Apple tries to remedy this with a convenient means of buying music, and Spotify paying big money to use the big names on its service, I’m hoping someone’s gonna come up with a, big new music service that’s better than both of those. Something that doesn’t ask you repeatedly to log in to your own music, and that actually pays the artists.

In the mean time, I’ll use PayPal to buy my music from artists’ bandcamp pages or from cdbaby or something. As for my own music, I’m still on Logic Express 8, and while I’ve been meaning to upgrade, Apple doesn’t make it easy for me to hand them my money…

PS. I’m still displeased with wordpress’ new interface. I can see one or two paragraphs of text in the New Post text box, and the resize thing doesn’t work. Navigating through the site to get to the Add New Post page thatactually works is troublesome because the whole thing defaults to the wrong blog. I have two. This belongs on the music one. Dear webmasters, stop “fixing” things by b0rking them!

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Stupid Creativity

Posted by Ad on November 18, 2011

I make music. I make video game music remixes; new arrangements for (usually) old games. Some people like my work. I easily get stuck with my songs, having written half of it, and getting tired of it. Whether it’s remixes or my original work, I just hit a point where I can’t get anything done.

Instead of sitting and doing nothing, my brain switches to some other creative mode, getting me interested in something else for a while. I go back to stories, writing, fiction, worldbuilding, and from there to just about anything. I might come up with an idea that would make a great movie or TV show, or a great computer/console game, or a great board game (less risk of appearing on torrent sites), or a great book, or a great… idunno, comic book?

Now, I could pursue a career in writing for these media, but I fear that’d take me away from doing what I love doing… and I don’t even know what I love doing. Maybe I love telling stories. Maybe I love to build things. Maybe I love entertaining. Maybe I love educating. Maybe I love expressing myself. Maybe I love putting hidden messages in everything I do to manipulate ppl into doing… something.

I realized the other day that despite my liking of video games, it’s not what I wanna spend the rest of my life making. Yes, I wanna make video games. Yes, I have more than a handful of ideas. Yes, I have stories I wanna tell through video games. Yes, I have game mechanics I wanna make use of. Yes, I think my games would be pretty good.

But I also want to write a couple of books, and I wouldn’t mind making a TV series (tho the thought of letting go of my intellectual property is a little troubling, good thing it’s not something I have to think about). I wanna make some board games. I wanna make lots and lots of music.

I wonder what the best approach is. Naturally, I’d wanna get the remix project I’m heading out of the way before trying to build a career doing something creative, but I should figure out what to do next. Try to make that board game I’ve been sketching out? Try to do something for a real video game (indie, probably)? Isolate myself from everything and everyone to write my book or my music? Try to juggle work, life, creative pursuits and sleep?

In any case, I should get a proper job, tho. I wouldn’t mind one in the game industry, but there’s quite a surplus of ppl who can write stuff or make music. Dunno how to market myself anyway. Sure, I’ve got an almost unique artist name, and ocremix has spread my name all over the net, but how do I actually communicate to the right ppl that I want to make music or write stuff for their game? Who are the right ppl, where are they?

tl;dr: Rozo, stop whining, get a job, learn programming.

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Oldskool music

Posted by Ad on August 16, 2011

Okay so, my own album work is going slow, and I’m thinking I have a bit too high a concept for the album I’ve been trying to make since June… so I’ll probably just do a compilation of whatever original works I think sound okay together. Just gotta finish them. Ugh…

Anyway, while on the topic of album work, here’s something totally different. Lots of Motoi Sakuraba-influenced tracks made with exposed synths and oldskool console game sounds, it’s Meteocrity Volume 1, an album by a friend of mine. I’ve been playing it i nthe background while working on non-music things from time to time, it’s great background music as it conjures up lots of game images but without being so specific as to draw you straight to a game, a level, a moment in the game. I guess it’s meta-vgm or something.

Did I mention it’s free? Well, now I did. Go get it.

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In Defense of Earth Music in Alien Settings

Posted by Ad on August 11, 2011

Okay, we’re talking science fiction speculative fiction stuff here. Just go with it. 😉

First, almost all rhythm is based on math. Indian ragas are really long, polyrhythmic stuff is difficult to quantize, but it’s all based on math. Rhythm is math. Any alien civ would understand math before going into space… unless they were really lucky and domesticated space dragons or something that just so happened to also live on their homeworld.

Second, pitch is based on math. And here’s the kicker – harmony is a physical phenomenon. That C and G sound good together is not arbitrary – it’s science. G is so close to the second harmonic of C that they sound good together. Harmonics are frequencies that are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. The fundamental can be arbitrary, but its harmonics will be twice, three, four, five etc times the fundamental frequency. In other words, physics – which doesn’t change much between us and aliens – make the harmonics. Harmonics make the circle of fifths. The circle of fifths makes the chromatic scale. The chromatic scale is on our pianos, our guitars, our synths. Sure, they can tune it differently, use different modes and scales (whole tone scale, anyone?), but more likely than not, they’d have the chromatic scale… If they like harmony, thatis.

Third, the vibrating string, the vibrating membrane, the basic waveforms – they’re based on math. Or rather, physics. Again, we’d have this in common. Would they prefer a sitar over a guitar, or a harpsichord over a piano? Do they want their drums tuned? Do they appreciate raw waveforms, or prefer more advanced synthesis techniques? Taste is different, and their instrument constructions and conventions would be different, but the core of the instruments would likely be the same – no matter the kind of instrument.

However…

This doesn’t mean they’ll like four on the floor beats. Maybe they only like rhythms based on prime numbers. Triplet rhythms might work, but if they’re sophisticated, they might want stuff like 11/8, 19/8, or something even higher. And what are the timbres of their rhythm instruments? If they even make that distinction.

This doesn’t mean they’ll necessarily have music in tune with ours. If they pick a fundamental in between two semitones of our chromatic scale, it’ll sound off-key. And it might not conform to any scale or mode we are used to. If they have and appreciate tonal music at all.

And nothing says their instruments need to be remotely like ours, nor do the techniques need to be the same. I can play part of a Chrono Trigger melody on harmonics on guitar, and often do this inadvertently while just playing. Perhaps they don’t have necks on their instruments, maybe they play on separate strings and/or harmonics. Maybe they play on a single string, which they change the tension of, thus changing the pitch with a more pitch-bend-like effect (our guitars are tuned this way, and played by changing the length of the freely vibrating string). Maybe they use advanced synthesis techniques to create ethereal soundscapes where many aspects of music bleed together into… well, something more sound design than music.

That said, I’m still bothered by how Stargate SG-1, Babylon 5, Star Wars, and so many other shows and movies have alien music that sounds like Earth music. Yes, you can use our scales and tunings. No, you can’t just decide that the aliens’ hat is jazz music or whatever. Composers, take heed.

You know, I should just make some examples. 😀

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These terms only appear in links pointing to this page

Posted by Ad on May 7, 2011

Post title is from almost any page with me in it, supposedly. When I check out the page google has cached, it says… well, the above message. Apparently, I’m on some pages linking to random artists I have no relation to, have never heard of, and that hardly have  music I enjoy. And when I click on a link, I’m not even on there.

Cindy Gomez…? Apparently, Someone’s using my name to link to her. Either someone who likes her also likes me, which isn’t all that weird since she sang on the Prince of Persia Sands of Time soundtrack… the video game, thatis. It’s either that, which I somehow doubt is all there is to it, or this is another side to the whole SEO linkfarm spamdexing shit that’s all over the net.

Google, please make a search algorithm that recognizes link farms and stuff like that for what they are. Optionally, someone point me to a better search engine. Not Bing. I said better. You know, when I use multiple search terms, I might actually wanna find a page with all search terms. Not this. (if you’re not seeing what I’m seeing, ask Google about THIS)

On that note, some of the results I get that actually do contain both me and her seem to think we’re similar artists.

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SEO

Posted by Ad on May 6, 2011

So there’s this thing websites do… or actually, the ppl running the websites, do. It’s when they utilize a variety of techniques to make their site seem more popular and more important to search engines. This is bugging me, and has been for some time. I like reading about ppl’s thoughts on my music. I like it when ppl mention me or my music. I like it when I inspire jewelry (really made my day, also mentioned on my twitter).

What I don’t like is having to spend so much time rewriting my searches so I can actually find this. Google’s selective searches do a decent job at filtering out some of the sites that pop up, but how do I know I’m not missing out on sites with genuine interst in my work?

So instead of blog and forum posts that mention my music, I get hundreds of free mp3 sites that offer for free a free mp3 of my music as free mp3s. I can’t think of any way it’s ethical to distribute my music on a site that does more to get in the way of my searches than to actually provide ppl with my music. I tried out a few of them, and in most cases they wanted me to install some executable. Even if this isn’t spyware of some kind, most of my music atm is free and shouldn’t require any hoops to get to. Especially not when someone else stands more to gain from those hoops than I do. I mean, I made the music.

And they hide behind the “we just provide access to the content, it’s not on our servers” excuse. I can understand the youtube newb uploading an album or music video of his/her favorite band/artist without considering this is possible sales and views lost from the artist/band (then again, piracy does increase interest and thus sales… at least with Minecraft). This is done out of appreciation for the music. Ripping game contents to share with other enthusiasts and provide a resource for potential enthusiasts? Fine with me. The modding community? I kind’a wanna join it. Free mp3 download for free get rozovian music free download downloads? Leave my music alone you soulless webcrawling zombie algorithms.

When I have an album out, I’ll want ppl to buy it. I’ll want ppl to tell me what they think. I’ll want ppl to stream it from places where I actually get some revenue back. I want _people_ to hear it. I want ppl to hear it from _me_, not from some spamtastic adful directory (that looks like crap anyway).

Some years ago, the only web find for “rozovian” was some Russian philosophy book (not why I chose the name). Then I got on fictionpress with my teen ambitions, I had a depressing blog about being me as a teen, I had a mikser.net account with two semi-decent original tracks, and I had some accounts on some forums. And then ocremix happened. Now I’m all over the web. Almost every mention of “rozovian” online is me and my ocremix tracks. For better or worse. Even that vid of some dude’s oil change tutorial with my music in the background is all over the place. And apparently on every other oil-related site out there spamming themselves with quasi-related content in order to look important to Google.

At least ocremix is big enough to be the top result for “rozovian”. At least for me.

And yes, I’m intentionally adding lots of links to me. Not accidentally. I want the algorithms to know they’re all me, and think they’re all more important. At least more important that free mp3s blah blah blah.

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Entitlement

Posted by Ad on November 4, 2010

From time to time, I google myself. It’s interesting to see what crops up then: a mention on a blog, listed in “listening to” references, youtube video clones, free download sites…

As I don’t have anything commersial out there, I don’t have a problem with any of this, but it has me worried. When I release an album, one I wanna earn some dough with, who’s to say it won’t end up uploaded everywhere so everyone can grab everything for free?

The internet is changing. Content creators have to come up with new ideas all the time to get money. Donations, merchandize, concerts, licensing… While some pirates may be pirates of convenience who would pay if it was easy enough – take Steam as a great example of how to deal with pirates of convenience: make buying _more_ convenient – others are pirates of economy or entitlement – they wouldn’t buy at all. Why should they get for free what I worked hard to produce? Spotify kind’a does the same with music as Steam does with games, it makes it convenient. Which reminds me, I should get Spotify. I need new music.

From time to time I deal with ppl with an inflated sense of entitlement on ocremix’ forums; people who expect to be good at music because they have good software, and expect to get their remix posted on ocremix because they made it. Why should they be any different from the ppl who spent years learning to make music? It’s unfair! Well it would be: it took me about a year of learning on ocremix before I got a remix posted, and that was after 5-6 years of making music. Was I annoyed at my first NO? Yes I was. Did that put my sense of entitlement in check? Yes it did. Would it be fair if any n00b with an audio file could get their stuff posted there? No it wouldn’t.

Because a lot of ppl grow up in a world where mom and dad get them whatever they want, and mom and dad have vague jobs somewhere out there, ppl might not make the connection between work and earnings. So ppl grow up with the idea of money as this thing that ppl just have. Not good.

I’ve been thinking about money a lot. With the world economy (and especially the US economy) dropping into the toilet, I looked up all these economy things I never cared for before. I realized there is no money. Money is just a promise of labor, or a proof of labor, depending on how you wanna look at it. Everyone has to work for something to get something. Back in the day, you’d farm your land, you’d get food. Or someone else would farm their land, you’d make them shovels and plows, and you’d get food. Money is the middle man. They give you money for the tools, you give them money for the food.

If I make music for you, don’t I sort of work for you? Shouldn’t I then get paid? Who’s supposed to pay me?

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